Dorjee Momo: Must-try Tibetan Food in DC

A while back, we had the pleasure of trying Dorjee Momo, and we were really excited to tell you guys all about their food.  Unfortunately, they’ve closed their pop-up since then, but we’re hoping they’ll be up and running again soon.  They were located on 317 7th St SE, and their space was intimate and cozy – definitely a solid date night spot!  Their menu was short but very sweet with several plant based options that tasted just as good, if not better than their meat dishes.

We got 5 different plates and shared everything between the two of us:  Sunflower Buns ($8), Roadside Pickle Plate ($9), Coconut Butter Grilled King Mushrooms ($14), Pan Fried Chicken Momo ($14), and their Beef Shapta with Young Bamboo & Jeera Rice ($16).  Although everything was pretty good, we had two clear favorites: the buns and the momo.  We’re totally getting ahead of ourselves right now though!  Let back things up and discuss.

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Dorjee Momo To start, let’s take a look at their pickle plate.  There were a nice assortment of goodies, but we honestly weren’t too impressed so we probably wouldn’t get this again.  It made for a nice photo though – aren’t these colors beautiful?

Then came the momo.  Now, these were something else!  At $14, these babies didn’t come cheap, but they were some of the best dumplings we’ve ever tasted.  You get 6 handmade chicken and ginger dumplings with 21-spice sepen in each order – we highly recommend getting an plate or 2 for the table, depending on how many people are in your group!



Dish no. 3 was their beef shapta: 48 hour marinated beef slices with zucchini, greens, snow peas, bamboo, and fried yucca.  This tasted much better than it looked, but everything paled in comparison to the buns and the momo soooo yeah.  If they decide to open a new location, we’re going HAM on their dumplings and buns.

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Dorjee Momo beef dish

There was just something SO special about their momo.  They steam and pan-fry ’em so the texture was on point, and the 21-spice sepen gave it a nice kick.  The chili sauce on top complemented the flavors beautifully, and the only negative is the fact that they’re no longer available for purchase [insert sad face here].  We hear their lamb is even better though so we hope to try that sooner rather than later.

Dorjee Momo dumplings

Now, onto the last two dishes of the night:  their mushrooms and their oh so magical buns.  We didn’t get a good shot of the shrooms so we’re just gonna tell you about the plate and hope you’re awesome at visualizing.  They came in a smoky orange sauce with sprouts and beet & carrot chutney.  The mushrooms were cooked to tender perfection, and the accompanying sauce was subtle yet full of flavor.  We know that sounds kind of like a contradiction, but you’ll know exactly what we mean when you try the dish yourself.

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And last but definitely not least, their vegan sunflower buns.  These babies contained spinach, glass noodle, and tofu and were glazed with mustard oil and a basil-cilantro sauce.  We’d honestly go back for these alone, and we can’t get over how nomtastic they were.  They came out piping hot, and they tasted just as good as they looked.  Dorjee Momo buns get an 11/10 from us.

Dorjee Momo sunflower buns

Nomsters, we’re so sorry for this.  We’re sorry we blogged about an awesome meal you can’t try, BUT look on the bright side, they’ll probably reopen soon so can just add this to your list of restaurants to hit up in the future.  Until then, we have plenty of other DC restaurants listed here!  See you on Thursday, friends.

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